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Browsing publications by Professor Candy Rowe.

Newcastle AuthorsTitleYearFull text
Dr Jasmine Clarkson
Dr Matthew Leach
Emeritus Professor Paul Flecknell
Professor Candy Rowe
Negative mood affects the expression of negative but not positive emotions in mice.2020
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Pattern contrast influences wariness in naïve predators towards aposematic patterns2020
Diana Umeton
Dr Ghaith Tarawneh
Eugenia Fezza
Professor Jenny Read
Professor Candy Rowe
et al.
Pattern and speed interact to hide moving prey2019
Professor Alexander Thiele
Professor Candy Rowe
Using preferred fluids and different reward schedules to motivate rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in cognitive tasks2019
Dr Jasmine Clarkson
Emeritus Professor Paul Flecknell
Dr Matthew Leach
Professor Candy Rowe
Handling method alters the hedonic value of reward in laboratory mice2018
Grace Holmes
Emeline Delferriere
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr John Skelhorn
Testing the feasibility of the startle-first route to deimatism.2018
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
The effect of distastefulness and conspicuous coloration on the post-attack rejection behaviour of predators and survival of prey2017
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
The Impact of Detoxification Costs and Predation Risk on Foraging: Implications for Mimicry Dynamics2017
Dr Helen Gray
Bradley Pearce
Professor Alexander Thiele
Professor Candy Rowe
The use of preferred social stimuli as rewards for rhesus macaques in behavioural neuroscience2017
Dr Diana Umeton
Professor Jenny Read
Professor Candy Rowe
Unravelling the illusion of flicker fusion2017
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Cognition and the evolution of camouflage2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Grace Holmes
Professor Candy Rowe
Deimatic or aposematic?2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
Learning about aposematic prey2016
Dr Helen Gray
Henri Bertrand
Claire Mindus
Emeritus Professor Paul Flecknell
Professor Candy Rowe
et al.
Physiological, behavioral, and scientific impact of different fluid control protocols in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)2016
Karen Smith
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
The benefits of being toxic to deter predators depends on prey body size2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
What do predators do? A response to comments on Skelhorn et al.2016
Dr Thomas Carle
Professor Candy Rowe
Avian predators change their foraging strategy on defended prey when undefended prey are hard to find2014
Professor Melissa Bateson
Professor Candy Rowe
Better the devil you know: Avian predators find variation in prey toxicity aversive2014
Karen Smith
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
Body size matters for aposematic prey during predator aversion learning2014
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Increased predation of nutrient-enriched aposematic prey2014
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr Susan Healy
Measuring cognition will be difficult but worth it: a response to comments on Rowe & Healy2014
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr Susan Healy
Measuring variation in cognition2014
Marion Chatelain
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
Ambient temperature influences birds' decisions to eat toxic prey2013
Dr Susan Healy
Professor Candy Rowe
Costs and benefits of evolving a larger brain: Doubts over the evidence that large brains lead to better cognition2013
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Predators' decisions to eat defended prey depend on the size of undefended prey2013
Professor Candy Rowe
Receiver Psychology: A Receiver's Perspective2013
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr Christina Halpin
Why are warning displays multimodal?2013
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr Susan Healy
Deterring hooded crows from re-nesting on power poles2012
Craig Barnett
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Melissa Bateson
Professor Candy Rowe
Educated predators make strategic decisions to eat defended prey according to their toxin content2012
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
The relationship between sympatric defended species depends upon predators’ discriminatory behaviour2012
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr Susan Healy
Is bigger always better?2011
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Birds learn to use distastefulness as a signal of toxicity2010
Dr Susan Healy
Professor Candy Rowe
Information processing: The ecology and evolution of cognitive abilities2010
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
Taste-rejection behaviour by predators can promote variability in prey defences2010
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Distastefulness as an antipredator defence strategy2009
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Being conspicuous and defended: Selective benefits for the individual2008
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Colour biases are more than a question of taste2008
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Naïve predators and selection for rare conspicuous defended prey: the initial evolution of aposematism revisited2008
Dr Susan Healy
Professor Candy Rowe
A critique of comparative studies of brain size2007
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Automimic frequency influences the foraging decisions of avian predators on aposematic prey2007
Professor Carel ten Cate
Professor Candy Rowe
Biases in signal evolution: learning makes a difference2007
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Predators' Toxin Burdens Influence Their Strategic Decisions to Eat Toxic Prey2007
Craig Barnett
Professor Melissa Bateson
Professor Candy Rowe
State-dependent decision making: educated predators strategically trade off the costs and benefits of consuming aposematic prey2007
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Avian predators taste-reject aposematic prey on the basis of their chemical defence2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Do the defense chemicals of visually distinct aposematic species interact to enhance predator learning and memory?2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Do the multiple defense chemicals of visually distinct species enhance predator learning?2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Predator avoidance learning of prey with secreted or stored defences and the evolution of insect defences2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Prey palatability influences predator learning and memory2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Taste-rejection by predators and the evolution of unpalatability in prey2006
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr John Skelhorn
Colour biases are a question of taste2005
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Frequency-dependent taste-rejection by avian predation may select for defence chemical polymorphisms in aposematic prey2005
Professor Candy Rowe
Multisensory learning: From experimental psychology to animal training2005
Professor Candy Rowe
Professor Julie Harris
Dr Craig Roberts
Seeing red? Putting sportswear in context2005
Professor Candy Rowe
Professor Julie Harris
Dr Craig Roberts
Sporting contests - Seeing red? Putting sportswear in context2005
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Tasting the difference: Do multiple defence chemicals interact in Müllerian mimicry?2005
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr John Skelhorn
Avian psychology and communication2004
Professor Candy Rowe
The importance of pattern similarity between Müllerian mimics in predator avoidance learning2004
Professor Candy Rowe
Sound improves visual discrimination learning in avian predators2002
Professor Candy Rowe
Non-warning odors trigger innate color aversions - As long as they are novel2001
Professor Candy Rowe
Pyrazine odour makes visually conspicuous prey aversive2001
Professor Candy Rowe
Aposematism: to be red or dead2000
Professor Candy Rowe
Novelty effects in a multimodal warning signal1999
Professor Candy Rowe
One signal or two?1999
Professor Candy Rowe
One signal or two? [multiple letters]1999
Professor Candy Rowe
Preface1999
Professor Candy Rowe
Receiver psychology and the evolution of multicomponent signals1999
Professor Candy Rowe
Sexual selection, speciation and imprinting: separating the sheep from the goats1999
Professor Candy Rowe
Sexual selection: separating genes from imprinting - Reply from I.P.F. Woens, C. Rowe and A.L.R. Thomas1999
Professor Candy Rowe
The evolution of multimodal warning displays1999