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Indian Literature and the World: Multilingualism, Translation and the Public Sphere

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Neelam Srivastava

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Abstract

This book is about the most vibrant yet under-studied aspects of Indian writing today. It examines multilingualism, current debates on postcolonial versus world literature, the impact of translation on an “Indian” literary canon, and Indian authors’ engagement with the public sphere. The essays cover political activism and the North-East Tribal novel; the role of work in the contemporary Indian fictional imaginary; history as felt and reconceived by the acclaimed Hindi author Krishna Sobti; Bombay fictions; the Dalit autobiography in translation and its problematic international success; development, ecocriticism and activist literature; casteism and access to literacy in the South; and gender and diaspora as dominant themes in writing from and about the subcontinent. Troubling Eurocentric genre distinctions and the split between citizen and subject, the collection approaches Indian literature from the perspective of its constant interactions between private and public narratives, thereby proposing a method of reading Indian texts that goes beyond their habitual postcolonial identifications as “national allegories”.


Publication metadata

Editor(s): Ciocca R, Srivastava N

Publication type: Edited Book

Publication status: Published

Series Title:

Year: 2017

Number of Pages: 288

Print publication date: 19/07/2017

Acceptance date: 05/07/2016

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Place Published: London, UK

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 9781137545497


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