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Vulnerability for mania - is it linked to problems delaying gratification?

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Thomas Meyer, Dr Antonia Newman, Dr Gabriele Jordan

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Abstract

Impulsivity is described as one of the main risk factors for mania. One facet of impulsivity, the inability to delay gratification, might be of special relevance, because a hypersensitivity to reward is hypothesized to be related to mania. The main aim of this study was to examine whether risk for mania is associated with deficits in the ability to delay gratification using both a behavioral and a self-report (UPPS) measure. An additional reason for choosing the UPPS was to see if prior results about an association between risk for mania and positive urgency could be replicated. Thirty-three individuals at risk for mania and a matched control group were selected using the Hypomanic Personality Scale and interviewed for a history of mood disorders. The main outcome measures were the Single-Key-Impulsivity-Paradigm and Monetary Choice Questionnaire. The groups did not differ in measures of gratification delay but we replicated other studies reporting significantly higher levels of positive urgency and sensation seeking in at-risk individuals. We suggest that individuals at risk might not generally be more impulsive but rather that impulsive behaviors might be triggered in response to specific mood states. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Meyer TD, Newman AL, Jordan G

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Psychiatry Research

Year: 2015

Volume: 229

Issue: 1-2

Pages: 359-364

Print publication date: 30/09/2015

Online publication date: 29/06/2015

Acceptance date: 26/06/2015

ISSN (print): 0165-1781

Publisher: Elsevier

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2015.06.040

DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.06.040


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