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Gender differences in white matter pathology and mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular disease

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Raj Kalaria

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

Background: Dementia risk in women is higher than in men, but the molecular neuropathology of this gender difference remains poorly defined. In this study, we used unbiased, discovery-driven quantitative proteomics to assess the molecular basis of gender influences on risk of Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular disease (AD + CVD). Results: We detected modulation of several redox proteins in the temporal lobe of AD + CVD subjects, and we observed sex-specific alterations in the white matter (WM) and mitochondria proteomes of female patients. Functional proteomic analysis of AD + CVD brain tissues revealed increased citrullination of arginine and deamidation of glutamine residues of myelin basic protein (MBP) in female which impaired degradation of degenerated MBP and resulted in accumulation of non-functional MBP in WM. Female patients also displayed down-regulation of ATP subunits and cytochromes, suggesting increased severity of mitochondria impairment in women. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that gender-linked modulation of white matter and mitochondria proteomes influences neuropathology of the temporal lobe in AD + CVD.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Gallart-Palau X, Lee BST, Adav SS, Qian J, Serra A, Park JE, Lai MKP, Chen CP, Kalaria RN, Sze SK

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Molecular Brain

Year: 2016

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

Online publication date: 17/03/2016

Acceptance date: 22/02/2016

Date deposited: 02/05/2017

ISSN (print): 1756-6606

Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.

URL: http://doi.org/10.1186/s13041-016-0205-7

DOI: 10.1186/s13041-016-0205-7


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