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De novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of intellectual disability with behavioral problems and dysmorphisms

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Joris Veltman

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Abstract

© 2019, European Society of Human Genetics. Determining pathogenicity of genomic variation identified by next-generation sequencing techniques can be supported by recurrent disruptive variants in the same gene in phenotypically similar individuals. However, interpretation of novel variants in a specific gene in individuals with mild–moderate intellectual disability (ID) without recognizable syndromic features can be challenging and reverse phenotyping is often required. We describe 24 individuals with a de novo disease-causing variant in, or partial deletion of, the F-box only protein 11 gene (FBXO11, also known as VIT1 and PRMT9). FBXO11 is part of the SCF (SKP1-cullin-F-box) complex, a multi-protein E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex catalyzing the ubiquitination of proteins destined for proteasomal degradation. Twenty-two variants were identified by next-generation sequencing, comprising 2 in-frame deletions, 11 missense variants, 1 canonical splice site variant, and 8 nonsense or frameshift variants leading to a truncated protein or degraded transcript. The remaining two variants were identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization and consisted of a partial deletion of FBXO11. All individuals had borderline to severe ID and behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, aggression) were observed in most of them. The most relevant common facial features included a thin upper lip and a broad prominent space between the paramedian peaks of the upper lip. Other features were hypotonia and hyperlaxity of the joints. We show that de novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of ID. The current series show the power of reverse phenotyping in the interpretation of novel genetic variances in individuals who initially did not appear to have a clear recognizable phenotype.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Jansen S, van der Werf IM, Innes AM, Afenjar A, Agrawal PB, Anderson IJ, Atwal PS, van Binsbergen E, van den Boogaard M-J, Castiglia L, Coban-Akdemir ZH, van Dijck A, Doummar D, van Eerde AM, van Essen AJ, van Gassen KL, Guillen Sacoto MJ, van Haelst MM, Iossifov I, Jackson JL, Judd E, Kaiwar C, Keren B, Klee EW, Klein Wassink-Ruiter JS, Meuwissen ME, Monaghan KG, de Munnik SA, Nava C, Ockeloen CW, Pettinato R, Racher H, Rinne T, Romano C, Sanders VR, Schnur RE, Smeets EJ, Stegmann APA, Stray-Pedersen A, Sweetser DA, Terhal PA, Tveten K, VanNoy GE, de Vries PF, Waxler JL, Willing M, Pfundt R, Veltman JA, Kooy RF, Vissers LELM, de Vries BBA

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: European Journal of Human Genetics

Year: 2019

Volume: 27

Issue: 5

Pages: 738-746

Print publication date: 01/05/2019

Online publication date: 24/01/2019

Acceptance date: 25/09/2018

ISSN (print): 1018-4813

ISSN (electronic): 1476-5438

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

URL: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41431-018-0292-2

DOI: 10.1038/s41431-018-0292-2


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