Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

European Governments' Responses to the 'Refugee Crisis': the Interdependence of EU Internal and External Controls

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Dimitris Skleparis

Downloads


Licence

This is the authors' accepted manuscript of an article that has been published in its final definitive form by Brill, 2017.

For re-use rights please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.


Abstract

In the face of the ‘refugee crisis’, many European governments, even in traditionally liberal states, unilaterally introduced a number of restrictive and, often, controversial migration, asylum, and border control policies. The author argues that past legal-bureaucratic choices on migration and asylum policies, ongoing developments in international relations at that time, the structural and perceived capacity of receiving states to cope with the refugee influx, and long-standing migration-related security concerns influenced the responses of many European governments amid the mass population movement. However, the author also suggests that the surfacing of particular policies across Europe was related to the newly elected Greek government’s attempted U-turn from similar repressive and controversial policies during that time. In this regard, the author maintains that repressive and controversial migration, asylum, and border control policies cannot simply be abolished within the context of the eu common market and interdependence of eu internal and external controls.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Skleparis D

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Southeastern Europe

Year: 2017

Volume: 41

Issue: 3

Pages: 276-301

Online publication date: 14/11/2017

Acceptance date: 29/06/2017

Date deposited: 14/08/2019

ISSN (print): 0094-4467

ISSN (electronic): 1876-3332

Publisher: Brill

URL: https://doi.org/10.1163/18763332-04103004

DOI: 10.1163/18763332-04103004


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share