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Erosion and illegibility of images: 'beyond the immediacy of the present'

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Christian Mieves

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This is the authors' accepted manuscript of an article that has been published in its final definitive form by Routledge, 2018.

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Abstract

The focus of this special journal issue ‘Erosion and Illegibility of Images’ is to explore the relationship of erosion and visibility through contemporary artistic practices at a moment when everything, as Latour suggests, is smashed to pieces. The essays in this issue deploy the notion of erosion as a conceptual tool in order to explore the shifting and depositing of materials, which is observed both on a formal visual level (the breaking up of the image surface) and a critical revaluation of memory, visibility and artistic tools. From an instrumentalist understanding of tools and material I set out to explore the impact of a radical restriction and limitation of traditional skills and craftsmanship on the artistic process. While recent research has focused predominantly on art theoretical understandings of ruins, the articles collected here aim to interrogate the relationship between artists, artistic tools and the materials of production in contemporary artistic practice by putting them in conversation with each other and scrutinizing interventions such as ‘preservation’, remaking, retro-recuperations and nostalgia work of several kinds.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Mieves C

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Visual Art Practice

Year: 2018

Volume: 17

Issue: 2-3

Pages: 135-143

Online publication date: 19/07/2018

Acceptance date: 01/09/2017

Date deposited: 18/09/2019

ISSN (print): 1470-2029

ISSN (electronic): 1758-9185

Publisher: Routledge

URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/14702029.2018.1466456

DOI: 10.1080/14702029.2018.1466456


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