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Deciphering the unique cellulose degradation mechanism of the ruminal bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Catherine Biggs, Professor Phillip Wright

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

© 2019, The Author(s).Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, isolated from the rumen of herbivores, is capable of robust lignocellulose degradation. However, the mechanism by which it achieves this is not fully elucidated. In this study, we have undertaken the most comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis, to date, of the changes in the cell envelope protein profile of F. succinogenes S85 in response to growth on cellulose. Our results indicate that the cell envelope proteome undergoes extensive rearrangements to accommodate the cellulolytic degradation machinery, as well as associated proteins involved in adhesion to cellulose and transport and metabolism of cellulolytic products. Molecular features of the lignocellulolytic enzymes suggest that the Type IX secretion system is involved in the translocation of these enzymes to the cell envelope. Finally, we demonstrate, for the first time, that cyclic-di-GMP may play a role in mediating catabolite repression, thereby facilitating the expression of proteins involved in the adhesion to lignocellulose and subsequent lignocellulose degradation and utilisation. Understanding the fundamental aspects of lignocellulose degradation in F. succinogenes will aid the development of advanced lignocellulosic biofuels.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Raut MP, Couto N, Karunakaran E, Biggs CA, Wright PC

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Scientific Reports

Year: 2019

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

Online publication date: 12/11/2019

Acceptance date: 22/10/2019

Date deposited: 25/11/2019

ISSN (electronic): 2045-2322

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

URL: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52675-8

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-52675-8

PubMed id: 31719545


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