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Biomechanical modulation therapy—a stem cell therapy without stem cells for the treatment of severe ocular burns

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Che Connon

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

© 2020 The Authors.Ocular injuries caused by chemical and thermal burns are often unmanageable and frequently result in disfigurement, corneal haze/opacification, and vision loss. Currently, a considerable number of surgical and pharmacological approaches are available to treat such injuries at either an acute or a chronic stage. However, these existing inter-ventions are mainly directed at (and limited to) suppressing corneal inflammation and neovascularization while promoting re-epithelialization. Reconstruction of the ocular surface represents a suitable but last-option recourse in cases where epithelial healing is severely impaired, such as due to limbal stem cell deficiency. In this concise review, we discuss how biomechanical modulation therapy (BMT) may represent a more effective approach to promoting the regeneration of ocular tissues affected by burn injuries via restoration of the limbal stem cell niche. Specifically, the scientific basis supporting this new therapeutic modality is described, along with our growing understanding of the role that tissue biomechanics plays in stem cell fate and function. The potential impact of BMT as a future treatment option for the management of injuries affecting tissue compliance is also further discussed.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Gouveia RM, Connon CJ

Publication type: Note

Publication status: Published

Journal: Translational Vision Science and Technology

Year: 2020

Volume: 9

Issue: 12

Pages: 1-11

Online publication date: 02/11/2020

Acceptance date: 07/09/2020

ISSN (electronic): 2164-2591

Publisher: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.

URL: https://doi.org/10.1167/tvst.9.12.5

DOI: 10.1167/tvst.9.12.5


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