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Temperature Estimation of SiC Power Devices using High Frequency Chirp Signals

Lookup NU author(s): Xiang Lu, Professor Volker Pickert, Dr Maher Al-Greer, Xiang Wang, Dr Charalampos Tsimenidis

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices have become increasingly popular in electric vehicles (EV) predominantly due to their high-switching speed allowing the construction of smaller power converters. Like silicon-based (Si) power switches, knowledge of the junction temperature, (TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices have become increasingly popular in electric vehicles (EV) predominantly due to their high-switching speed allowing the construction of smaller power converters. Like silicon-based (Si) power switches, knowledge of the junction temperature, (TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices have become increasingly popular in electric vehicles (EV) predominantly due to their high-switching speed allowing the construction of smaller power converters. Like silicon-based (Si) power switches, knowledge of the junction temperature, (TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices have become increasingly popular in electric vehicles (EV) predominantly due to their high-switching speed allowing the construction of smaller power converters. Like silicon-based (Si) power switches, knowledge of the junction temperature, (TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices have become increasingly popular in electric vehicles (EV) predominantly due to their high-switching speed allowing the construction of smaller power converters. Like silicon-based (Si) power switches, knowledge of the junction temperature, (TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter. TjTj) can be gained by measuring temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). This paper presents a new technique to estimate TjTj for a single-chip SiC MOSFET device. High-frequency chirp signals below the resonant frequency of the gate source impedance are injected into the gate of a discrete SiC device during its off-state operation. The gate-source voltage frequency response is captured and processed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In a second step, data is accumulated and presented over the chirp frequency spectrum. The result is a linear relationship between the processed gate-source voltage and TjTj. The effectiveness of the proposed TSEP is demonstrated in a laboratory scenario, where chirp signals are injected in a stand-alone biased discrete SiC module and in-field scenario where the TSEP is applied to a MOSFET operating in a DC/DC converter.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Lu X, Pickert V, Al-Greer M, Chen C, Wang X, Tsimenidis C

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Energies

Year: 2021

Volume: 14

Issue: 16

Online publication date: 11/08/2021

Acceptance date: 06/08/2021

Date deposited: 30/08/2021

ISSN (electronic): 1996-1073

Publisher: MDPI

URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/en14164912

DOI: 10.3390/en14164912


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