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The development of a General Nasal Patient Inventory

Lookup NU author(s): Andrew Robson, Emerita Professor Janet Wilson

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Abstract

Most available clinical outcome measures for rhinology patients relate to specific nasal disease or general quality of life. Fairley's validated 12-item questionnaire measures general nasal symptoms, but is a 'physician-derived' clinical tool and may not reflect all the problems that rhinology patients experience. Our aims were to develop a patient-orientated questionnaire, representing the concerns of a large number of rhinology patients, called the General Nasal Patient Inventory (GNPI) and compare this with the Fairley nasal questionnaire (FNQ). The GNPI was developed from the open-ended problem lists of 211 rhinology patients, from the 45 most frequent complaints. Both questionnaires were then administered to 153 general rhinology patients and the results compared. The highest-ranking items for each questionnaire were different, but the total scores were highly correlated (r=0.79, P <0.0001). Factor analysis showed six factors to account for 75% of FNQ variance and 18 factors for 78% of GNPI variance. The 45-item GNPI, the first patient-derived, comprehensive nasal questionnaire could be a time-saving tool in rhinology clinics and more sensitive to change after intervention than other available measures.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Douglas SA, Marshall AH, Walshaw D, Robson AK, Wilson JA

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences

Year: 2001

Volume: 26

Issue: 5

Pages: 425-429

ISSN (print): 0307-7772

ISSN (electronic): 1365-2273

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2273.2001.00497.x

DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2273.2001.00497.x

PubMed id: 11678952


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