Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

Azathioprine for atopic dermatitis

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Simon Meggitt, Professor Nick Reynolds

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

For adults with atopic dermatitis (AD) refractory to topical treatment, the choices of second-line therapy are limited. Furthermore, there are concerns about the long-term safety of treatments such as cyclosporin. Limited open studies suggest that azathioprine may be effective, although controlled trial data is lacking. Nevertheless, many UK dermatologists use azathioprine to treat patients with severe AD, despite the potential risk of serious toxicity. Azathioprine myelotoxicity and drug efficacy are now known to be related to the activity of a key enzyme in azathioprine metabolism, thiopurine-methyltransferase (TPMT). Recently, the facility for TPMT measurement has become more widely available, providing the possibility to optimize the therapeutic effect of azathioprine, yet minimise the risk of toxicity. We review the evidence concerning the use of azathioprine for AD, and have identified 128 cases in eight open studies, including our own prospective trial. Improvement in the majority was noted in seven studies, although objective measures of disease activity were used in only one trial. Measurements of TPMT activity were performed in the two most recent studies only. These data underscore the requirement for a prospective randomised controlled trial, and highlight the need to further investigate the role of TPMT measurement in azathioprine usage.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Meggitt SJ, Reynolds NJ

Publication type: Review

Publication status: Published

Journal: Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

Year: 2001

Volume: 26

Issue: 5

Pages: 369-375

Print publication date: 01/01/2001

ISSN (print): 0307-6938

ISSN (electronic): 1365-2230

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2230.2001.00837.x

DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2230.2001.00837.x

PubMed id: 11488818


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share