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Inaccuracy of glomerular-filtration rate estimation from height/plasma creatinine ratio

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Roderick Skinner, Professor Andrew Pearson, Dr Malcolm Coulthard, Emeritus Professor Alan Craft

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Abstract

Use of a height/plasma creatinine formula to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is simpler and less invasive than renal or plasma clearance methods. The aim of this study was to determine whether these formulas enabled accurate prediction of GFR measured from the plasma clearance of Cr-51 labelled ethylene-diaminetetra-acetic acid (Cr-51-EDTA). Thirty nine patients underwent GFR measurement at least six months after potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapy. Altman-Bland analysis was performed on the measured GFR and that estimated simultaneously using the original and a modified Counahan- Barratt formula and the Schwartz formula. The limits of agreement of the estimated GFR with the measured GFR were unacceptably wide in each case, despite highly significant correlation coefficients, The bias was smallest for the modified Counahan-Barratt formula. Use of these formulas to estimate GFR in children is insufficiently accurate for research purposes and has limitations in clinical practice. Furthermore, use of correlation coefficients to evaluate different methods of measuring GFR is inappropriate.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Skinner R, Cole M, Pearson ADJ, Keir MJ, Price L, Wyllie RA, Coulthard MG, Craft AW

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood

Year: 1994

Volume: 70

Issue: 5

Pages: 387-390

Print publication date: 01/05/1994

ISSN (print): 0003-9888

ISSN (electronic): 1468-2044

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/adc.70.5.387

DOI: 10.1136/adc.70.5.387

PubMed id: 8017958


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