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FGF signal transduction and the regulation of Cdx gene expression

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Iain Keenan

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Abstract

Cdx homeodomain transcription factors play important roles in the development of the vertebrate body axis and gut epithelium. Signaling involving FGF, wnt and retinoic acid ligands has been implicated in the regulation of individual Cdx genes. In this study we examine the requirement for FGF-dependent signal transduction pathways in the regulation of Cdx gene expression. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis the earliest expression of Cdx1, Cdx2 and Cdx4 is within the developing mesoderm. We show that a functional FGF signaling pathway is required for the normal expression of all three amphibian Cdx genes during gastrula stages. We show that FGF stimulation activates signaling through both the MAP kinase pathway and the PI-3 kinase pathway in Xenopus tissue explants. However, our analysis of these pathways in gastrula stage embryos indicates that the MAP kinase pathway is required for Cdx gene expression, whereas the PI-3 kinase pathway is not. We show that FGF and wnt signaling can interact in the regulation of Cdx genes and during gastrula stages the normal expression of the Cdx genes requires the activity of both pathways. Furthermore, we show that wnt mediated Cdx regulation is independent of the MAP kinase pathway.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Keenan ID; Sharrard RM; Isaacs HV

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Developmental Biology

Year: 2006

Volume: 299

Issue: 2

Pages: 478-88

ISSN (print): 0012-1606

ISSN (electronic): 1095-564X

Publisher: Academic Press

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2006.08.040

DOI: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2006.08.040


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