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Emerging drugs for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Naw April Phaw, Dr Jess Dyson, Professor David Jones

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Abstract

© 2020, © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Introduction: Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a progressive inflammatory autoimmune cholestatic liver disease. Without treatment, it may result in fibrosis and eventually end stage liver disease. In addition to the disease burden, the symptom impact on the quality of life for PBC patients is significant. Ursodeoxycholic acid, and the second-line therapy, Obeticholic acid, are the only available licensed treatments. Although there has been rapid development of novel therapies in recent years for the treatment of PBC, there are very few symptoms directed therapies. Area covered: This literature review aims to review the current treatment landscape in PBC and to explore how the next few years may unfold in the field. The current guidelines and emerging therapies in phase 2, 3 and 4 clinical trials have been included. Expert opinion: The currently available therapies are effective, but their use has limitations and challenges and there is still significant unmet need. Although there have been promising therapeutic interventions in recent years, further research into personalizing therapeutic strategies with available treatments and new agents is needed.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Phaw NA, Dyson JK, Jones D

Publication type: Review

Publication status: Published

Journal: Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs

Year: 2020

Volume: 25

Issue: 2

Pages: 101-112

Online publication date: 07/04/2020

Acceptance date: 01/04/2020

ISSN (print): 1472-8214

ISSN (electronic): 1744-7623

Publisher: Taylor and Francis Ltd

URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/14728214.2020.1751814

DOI: 10.1080/14728214.2020.1751814

PubMed id: 32253941


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