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Understanding the burden of interstitial lung disease post-COVID-19: The UK Interstitial Lung Disease-Long COVID Study (UKILD-Long COVID)

Lookup NU author(s): Professor John Simpson

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

© Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic has led to over 100 million cases worldwide. The UK has had over 4 million cases, 400 000 hospital admissions and 100 000 deaths. Many patients with COVID-19 suffer long-term symptoms, predominantly breathlessness and fatigue whether hospitalised or not. Early data suggest potentially severe long-term consequence of COVID-19 is development of long COVID-19-related interstitial lung disease (LC-ILD). Methods and analysis The UK Interstitial Lung Disease Consortium (UKILD) will undertake longitudinal observational studies of patients with suspected ILD following COVID-19. The primary objective is to determine ILD prevalence at 12 months following infection and whether clinically severe infection correlates with severity of ILD. Secondary objectives will determine the clinical, genetic, epigenetic and biochemical factors that determine the trajectory of recovery or progression of ILD. Data will be obtained through linkage to the Post-Hospitalisation COVID platform study and community studies. Additional substudies will conduct deep phenotyping. The Xenon MRI investigation of Alveolar dysfunction Substudy will conduct longitudinal xenon alveolar gas transfer and proton perfusion MRI. The POST COVID-19 interstitial lung DiseasE substudy will conduct clinically indicated bronchoalveolar lavage with matched whole blood sampling. Assessments include exploratory single cell RNA and lung microbiomics analysis, gene expression and epigenetic assessment. Ethics and dissemination All contributing studies have been granted appropriate ethical approvals. Results from this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals. Conclusion This study will ensure the extent and consequences of LC-ILD are established and enable strategies to mitigate progression of LC-ILD.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Wild JM, Porter JC, Molyneaux PL, George PM, Stewart I, Allen RJ, Aul R, Baillie JK, Barratt SL, Beirne P, Bianchi SM, Blaikley JF, Brooke J, Chaudhuri N, Collier G, Denneny EK, Docherty A, Fabbri L, Gibbons MA, Gleeson FV, Gooptu B, Hall IP, Hanley NA, Heightman M, Hillman TE, Johnson SR, Jones MG, Khan F, Lawson R, Mehta P, Mitchell JA, Plate M, Poinasamy K, Quint JK, Rivera-Ortega P, Semple M, Simpson AJ, Smith DJF, Spears M, Spencer LG, Stanel SC, Thickett DR, Thompson AAR, Walsh SLF, Weatherley ND, Weeks ME, Wootton DG, Brightling CE, Chambers RC, Ho L-P, Jacob J, Piper Hanley K, Wain LV, Jenkins RG

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: BMJ Open Respiratory Research

Year: 2021

Volume: 8

Issue: 1

Online publication date: 23/09/2021

Acceptance date: 19/08/2021

Date deposited: 13/10/2021

ISSN (electronic): 2052-4439

Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group

URL: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjresp-2021-001049

DOI: 10.1136/bmjresp-2021-001049


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