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Browsing publications by Professor Nick Holliman.

Newcastle AuthorsTitleYearFull text
Professor Nick Holliman
Experience with searching in displays containing depth improves search performance by training participants to search more exhaustively2020
Richard Cloete
Professor Nick Holliman
Measuring and simulating latency in interactive remote rendering systems2019
Professor Nick Holliman
Manu Antony
Stephen Dowsland
Mark Turner
Petascale Cloud Supercomputing for Terapixel Visualization of a Digital Twin2019
Professor Nick Holliman
Manu Antony
Stephen Dowsland
Professor Philip James
Mark Turner
et al.
Petascale Cloud Supercomputing for Terapixel Visualization of a Digital Twin2019
Professor Nick Holliman
Dr Sara Fernstad
Dr Mike Simpson
Dr Kevin Wilson
Visual Entropy and the Visualization of Uncertainty2019
Professor Nick Holliman
Stereoscopic displays and applications XXIX - Introduction2018
Stephen Dowsland
Mark Turner
Professor Nick Holliman
A Scalable Platform for Visualization Using the Cloud2017
Professor Nick Holliman
Adding depth to overlapping displays can improve visual search performance2017
Emeritus Professor Eric Cross
Professor Nick Holliman
Dr Louise Kempton
Jason Legget
Professor Jonathan Sapsed
et al.
Creative Fuse North East: Initial Report2017
Professor Nick Holliman
Binocular fixation imaging method and apparatus2016
Professor Nick Holliman
Assessing the benefits of stereoscopic displays to visual search: methodology and initial findings2015
Professor Nick Holliman
Evaluating subjective impressions of quality controlled 3D films on large and small screens2015
Professor Nick Holliman
Professor Paul Watson
Scalable Real-Time Visualization Using the Cloud2015
Professor Nick Holliman
An evaluation of reconstruction filters for a path-searching task in 3D2014
Professor Nick Holliman
Dr Daniela Vaideanu-Collins
Anthony Hildreth
Professor David Steel
Assessment of stereoscopic optic disc images using an autostereoscopic screen - Experimental study2008