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Browsing publications by Dr John Skelhorn.

Newcastle AuthorsTitleYearFull text
Dr John Skelhorn
The peppered moth Biston betularia2022
Dr John Skelhorn
Dietary wariness2021
Dr Jolian Troscianko
Dr John Skelhorn
Variable crab camouflage patterns defeat search image formation2021
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Pattern contrast influences wariness in naïve predators towards aposematic patterns2020
Dr John Skelhorn
The antipredator benefits of postural camouflage in peppered moth caterpillars2020
Dr John Skelhorn
Distaste and disgust responses2019
Dr John Skelhorn
Avoiding death by feigning death2018
Dr Jolian Troscianko
Dr John Skelhorn
Camouflage strategies interfere differently with observer search images2018
Dr John Skelhorn
Prey mistake masquerading predators for the innocuous items they resemble2018
Grace Holmes
Emeline Delferriere
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr John Skelhorn
Testing the feasibility of the startle-first route to deimatism.2018
Dr Jolian Troscianko
Dr John Skelhorn
Quantifying camouflage: how to predict detectability from appearance2017
Dr John Skelhorn
The biology of color2017
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
The Impact of Detoxification Costs and Predation Risk on Foraging: Implications for Mimicry Dynamics2017
Dr John Skelhorn
Bitter tastes can influence birds' dietary expansion strategies2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Cognition and the evolution of camouflage2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Grace Holmes
Professor Candy Rowe
Deimatic or aposematic?2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Grace Holmes
Eyespots2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
Learning about aposematic prey2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Grace Holmes
Multicomponent deceptive signals reduce the speed at which predators learn that prey are profitable2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Dr Christina Halpin
Professor Candy Rowe
What do predators do? A response to comments on Skelhorn et al.2016
Dr John Skelhorn
Body size affects the evolution of eyespots in caterpillars2015
Dr John Skelhorn
Masquerade2015
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Increased predation of nutrient-enriched aposematic prey2014
Dr John Skelhorn
Giles Dorrington
The position of eyespots and thickened segments influence their protective value to caterpillars2014
Dr John Skelhorn
Viewing distance affects how the presence of inedible models influence the benefit of masquerade2014
Dr John Skelhorn
Bitter taste enhances predatory biases against aggregations of prey with warning colouration2013
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Predators' decisions to eat defended prey depend on the size of undefended prey2013
Craig Barnett
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Melissa Bateson
Professor Candy Rowe
Educated predators make strategic decisions to eat defended prey according to their toxin content2012
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
The relationship between sympatric defended species depends upon predators’ discriminatory behaviour2012
Dr John Skelhorn
Colour biases are a question of conspecifics' taste2011
Dr John Skelhorn
Density-dependent predation influences the evolution and behavior of masquerading prey2011
Dr John Skelhorn
Mimicking multiple models: polyphenetic masqueraders gain additional benefits from crypsis2011
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Birds learn to use distastefulness as a signal of toxicity2010
Dr John Skelhorn
Masquerade: camouflage without crypsis2010
Dr John Skelhorn
Predators are less likely to misclassify masquerading prey when their models are present2010
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Distastefulness as an antipredator defence strategy2009
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Being conspicuous and defended: Selective benefits for the individual2008
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Colour biases are more than a question of taste2008
Dr John Skelhorn
Ecological factors influencing the evolution of insects' chemical defenses2008
Dr Christina Halpin
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Naïve predators and selection for rare conspicuous defended prey: the initial evolution of aposematism revisited2008
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Automimic frequency influences the foraging decisions of avian predators on aposematic prey2007
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Predators' Toxin Burdens Influence Their Strategic Decisions to Eat Toxic Prey2007
Dr John Skelhorn
Avian predators attack aposematic prey more forcefully when they are part of an aggregation2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Avian predators taste-reject aposematic prey on the basis of their chemical defence2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Do the defense chemicals of visually distinct aposematic species interact to enhance predator learning and memory?2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Do the multiple defense chemicals of visually distinct species enhance predator learning?2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Predator avoidance learning of prey with secreted or stored defences and the evolution of insect defences2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Prey palatability influences predator learning and memory2006
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Taste-rejection by predators and the evolution of unpalatability in prey2006
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr John Skelhorn
Colour biases are a question of taste2005
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Frequency-dependent taste-rejection by avian predation may select for defence chemical polymorphisms in aposematic prey2005
Dr John Skelhorn
Professor Candy Rowe
Tasting the difference: Do multiple defence chemicals interact in Müllerian mimicry?2005
Professor Candy Rowe
Dr John Skelhorn
Avian psychology and communication2004