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Sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of consuming home-cooked meals and meals from out-of-home sources: cross-sectional analysis of a population-based cohort study

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Susanna Mills, Dr Jean Adams, Professor Martin White, Dr Wendy Wrieden, Dr Heather Brown

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

ObjectiveTo identify sociodemographic characteristics associated with frequency of consuming home cooked meals and meals from out of home sources.DesignCross-sectional analysis of a population-based cohort study. Frequency of consuming home cooked meals, ready meals, takeaways and meals out were derived from a participant questionnaire. Sociodemographic characteristics regarding sex, age, ethnicity, working overtime, and socioeconomic status (SES) measured by household income, educational attainment, occupational status and employment status were self-reported. Sociodemographic differences in higher versus lower meal consumption frequency were explored using logistic regression, adjusted for other key sociodemographic variables.SettingCambridgeshire, United Kingdom.SubjectsFenland study participants (n=11,326), aged 29 to 64 years at baseline.ResultsEating home cooked meals more frequently was associated with being female, older, of higher SES (measured by greater educational attainment and household income) and not working overtime. Being male was associated with a higher frequency of consumption for all out of home meal types.Consuming takeaways more frequently was associated with lower SES (measured by lower educational attainment and household income), whereas eating out more frequently was associated with higher SES (measured by greater educational attainment and household income) and working overtime.ConclusionsSociodemographic characteristics associated with frequency of eating meals from different out of home sources varied according to meal source. Findings may be used to target public health policies and interventions for promoting healthier diets and dietary-related health, towards people consuming home cooked meals less frequently such as men, those with lower educational attainment and household income, and overtime workers.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Mills S, Adams J, White M, Wrieden W, Brown H

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Public Health Nutrition

Year: 2018

Volume: 21

Issue: 12

Pages: 2255-2266

Print publication date: 01/08/2018

Online publication date: 11/04/2018

Acceptance date: 05/03/2018

Date deposited: 05/03/2018

ISSN (print): 1368-9800

ISSN (electronic): 1475-2727

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018000812

DOI: 10.1017/S1368980018000812


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